Real and ConfirmedLiterature Waec Answers 2022

WAEC 2022 English Literature Answer

LITERATURE IN ENGLISH WAEC ANSWER 2022

Note you are to answer two questions in all one question in section A and one question in section B that’s two

 

=====================================================
QUESTION 1

(1)

Lawyer Nweze courts the attentions of Beneatha. In trying to win her affections, he is persistent but never overbearing. He flatters her with gifts (something that George Murchison has not done); in addition, Asagai’s gifts are not meaningless trinkets but are things that are both useful to and desired by Beneatha — such as the Nigerian robes he clearly has gone to a lot of trouble to obtain. Asagai’s compliments to Beneatha are sincere and therefore believable. His peaceful ways and calm manner give Beneatha an appreciation of his views even when they disagree. Contrasted with George Murchison’s abrasive put-downs of Beneatha and George’s insistence on retaining his narrow-minded views, Asagai appears as Beneatha’s savior from the potential tragedy of her eventually becoming George’s wife. In other words Asagai is helpful and concerned about the welfare of others. He volunteers to assist in the move to Clybourne Park and offers much-needed consolation and good advice to Beneatha when she is at her lowest. He counsels Beneatha spiritually and emotionally, helping her to get back “on track” as she rails against her brother’s foolishness in having lost the money.
He was used in the play to make a radical point about race

=====================================================
QUESTION 2

(2)
In Second-Class Citizen, Adah and Francis are alike in that at the beginning of the novel, they are both poor students. In nearly every other way, however, they are opposites, for Adah is strong and determined to make a better life and takes active steps toward doing so while Francis denies his responsibilities and is weak, lazy, controlling, and abusive.

When Adah and Francis marry, both of them are students, and both of them are poor. Francis cannot even pay Adah’s bride price, yet she chooses him anyway, hoping to have some stability in her life so she can continue her education.

However, Adah and Francis turn out to be two completely different people with different goals and personalities. Adah is a strong woman with deep and lasting dreams and a determination to achieve them at all costs. She struggles greatly, but she keeps on going, working and caring for her children the best she can. She tries to make her life better, finding jobs she enjoys and pursuing her writing. Adah tends to be both optimistic and realistic. While she hopes her life will get better, she takes active steps to make it do so.

 

Francis is just the opposite of Adah. He is weak and lazy. Instead of valuing the educational opportunities, he has been given, he fails his exams. Then he blames Adah for his failures. When he has to go to work, Francis complains mightily, accusing Adah of being lazy even when she is recovering from giving birth. Francis is also controlling and abusive. Even though Adah earns most of the family’s money, Francis considers it his. He also beats Adah physically and attacks her emotionally. He burns his wife’s manuscript, too, out of spite and jealousy.

In the end, Francis refuses to even take responsibility for his children. He denies that they are his and burns the paperwork that proves they are.

=====================================================
QUESTION 3

(3) HOW MASSA IS BURIED
MASSA IS BURIED to the poet in the above poet, the summer has many defects unlike his beloved. In other words proceeds to outline the ways in which she actually exceeds it. First, he says that a summer day is actually not as lovely or temperate as she is. Sometimes “Rough winds shake the darling buds” and “summer’s lease hath all too short a date”; in other words, summer can be somewhat extreme, even volatile, and it does not last very long because it eventually gives way to autumn. Further, sometimes summer can be “too hot” and then, other times, the sun goes away for a long time (when “his gold complexion” is “dimm’d”). Furthermore, nature’s beauty has a way of “declin[ing]” as time passes. The speaker’s love, on the other hand, lives in an “eternal summer” because her beauty will never die; he has immortalized her and her beauty in these lines, and so she is better than literal summer. Hence the defects of the summer is day makes it impossible to be compared to the poet beloved.
==================
*SECTION B*
*Literature in English Answers*
*Q7*
The central theme of Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë is the relationship between Cathy and Heathcliff. The problem of the bond between Cathy and Heathcliff and its significance remains the central mystery of the novel till the very end. In fact, the novel is a revengeful love story of Heathcliff, the protagonist.

Catherine is the daughter of Mr & Mrs. Earnshaw and Heathcliff is a pickup boy by Mr. Earnshaw from the slums of Liverpool city and is named Heathcliff Earnshaw by Mr. Earnshaw. Mr. Earnshaw’s treatment towards Heathcliff is likely a father’s treatment towards his own child. Environment of the moor and same dwelling place gives both Cathy and Heathcliff a greater chance to develop their romantic love-affair. In addition, Cathy’s own brother, Hindley’s hostile and cruel treatments towards Heathliff fines Cathy’s love for Heathliff.

As children, Cathy and Heathcliff seem to represent the spirit of Freedom as they are rebelling against the tyrannical authority represented by Hindley. They are also rebelling against religious bigotry as represented by Joseph.

Their love exists on a higher or spiritual plane; they are soul mates, two people who have an affinity for each other which draws them together irresistibly. Heathcliff repeatedly calls Catherine his soul.

A life-force relationship is a principle that is not conditioned by anything but it. Catherine and Heathcliff’s love is based on their shared perception that they are the same. Catherine declares, famously, “I am Heathcliff,” while Heathcliff, upon Catherine’s death, wails that he cannot live without his “soul,” meaning Catherine.

Both Cathy and Heathcliff love each other profoundly. Yet we notice some ambiguity in both Cathy’s speech and action.

Cathy and Heathcliff are creatures of the wild moorland where conventional social standards are meaningless. After meeting with Edgar, Cathy develops an interest towards him. She now seems to be equally interested in Edgar and Heathcliff. She has not certainly given up Heathcliff. In fact she defines her brother Hindley and manages to meet Heathcliff secretly. Indeed there remains a striking contrast between Edgar and Heathcliff far as behavior, looks and refinement is concerned. And it is obvious for a sweet girl of fifteen to be in dilemma about both of them because one is her earlier love and later another appears with more redefined and behavior.

Cathy decides to marry Edgar for his social status. She decides to marry Edgar for his social standards. Indeed he is handsome, young and cheerful. But she informs Nelly, the house keeper, of her profound attachment to Heathcliff, saying

“Nelly he (Heathcliff) is more myself than I am. Whatever our sols are made of, his ad mine are the same.”

But Heathcliff who loves Cathy more than anything in his life overhears Cathy saying to Nelley:-

“It would degrade me to marry Heathcliff, now.”’

He would not hear further as he leaves with his heart which is teared up into several pieces and blood is blowing from his hear inwardly. From this context of Cathy’s speech we can have a clear notion that the love affair between Cathy and Heathliff is anti-social as Heathcliff is a pick up boy and then is no trait of his parents.

After overhearing such stuff, Heathcliff leaves the Wuthering Heights without saying anything to anybody and leaves no traces of him.

When Heathcliff has left, Cathy marries Edgar. After her marriages she understands her betrayal of her true self and as a result she is going to be sick and ill in accordance with the passing of days. After six months of their marriages, Heathcliff returns and seeing him live Cathy feels so delighted. Inspite of Edgars dismay, Cathy and Heathcliff sit looking at one another “absorbed in their mutual joy to suffer embarrassment.” Yet there is no romantic erotic infatuation.

Though she is married to Edgar, she fwhichan ardent love and desire for Heathcliff which is anti- social. She believes that Linton is subordinate and that Heathcliff is part of her.

In Chapter 15, Heathcliff himself burst into Cathy’s room and in a moment she was in his arms. He begins to show countless kisses on her. Then Cathy confesses that she is responsible for everything because she has married Edgar when she has actually been in love with him (Heathcliff). She then asks him to kiss her again.

Twelve years have passed after Cathy’s death. Heathcliff suffers a lot and at the same time make others to suffer.

When Edgar Linton dies and the designs of Linton’s grave is going on Heathcliff bribes the Sexton to remove the earth of the lid of the coffin in which Cathy lay. And opening the lid of the coffin and has seen Cathy’s face again. In fact, he has, with his own hands, digs out her grave on this occasion. This he has done out of his titanic love for Cathy. But in view of social perspective, what he has done for love is really amoral.

Not only that he has also bribed the Sexton to pull away one panel of the coffin, his object being, that when he himself dies, his dead body should be buried close to Cathy’s dead body without being there any wall between them. His unfathomable love for Cathy makes him do such thing that is anti-moral.

At the end, we can say that the unalloyed love of Heathcliff turns to anti-moral as well as anti-social because of Cathy’s ambition to get social standard and his own psychological problem.

In Wuthering Heights Catherine and Heathcliff’s love is a direct challenge to those social forces of family and class which tyrannize, oppress and restrict individuals and their relationship.
———————————
——————————–

*SECTION B*

(8)
In the novel Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte, Cathy Linton and Hareton Earnshaw are part of the second generation of residents at Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange.

Cathy’s mother is Catherine Earnshaw. Hareton’s father is Hindley Earnshaw.
Catherine and Hindley Earnshaw are siblings that first lived at Wuthering Heights with their parents.

Cathy Linton is the daughter of Catherine and Edgar Linton. Hareton Earnshaw is the son of Hindley Earnshaw and Isabella Linton. Hareton has been raised by Heathcliff and treated as a servant since his father died. Heathcliff also has a son, Linton, who has lived with him since Linton’s mother, Isabella, who is also Edgar’s sister, passed away.

Cathy is first introduced to Hareton when she travels to Wuthering Heights to visit her cousin, Linton. When she sees Hareton, she assumes he is a stable boy and begins to order him around.

Cathy and Hareton have fallen in love at the end of Wuthering Heights. Their relationship mirrors almost identically the love Catherine Earnshaw and Heathcliff once shared.

Cathy and Hareton have developed a strong, loving relationship, and will undoubtedly soon be married.

Although Cathy has long scorned Hareton, she finally relents, making overtures of friendship and offering to teach him to read.  Hareton, indignant that she blames their past enmity on him, at first rebuffs her, but he soon softens, and the cousins establish an amiable truce which quickly develops into something deeper.

The two overcome their biggest obstacle when Hareton forbids Cathy to speak ill of Heathcliff, and Cathy, with a growing maturity based on love, decides it would only be cruel to persist in trying to make Hareton see that Heathcliff has treated him abominably, realizing that “he was attached by ties stronger than reason could break”.

As she watches Hareton and Cathy huddle like innocent, happy children over a book in Chapter 32, Nelly relates that their “intimacy thus commenced grew rapidly…both minds tending to the same point – one loving and desiring to esteem, and the other loving and desiring to be esteemed – they contrived in the end to reach it”.  She sees their eventual union as inevitable, calling it will be “the crown of all my wishes”

========≠=========================

 

 

 

CLICK HERE TO VEIW MORE LITERATURE ANSWER FREE.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*